Mr. Fantastic vs. Namor

Another Fantastic Four article!

So Namor, the Sub-Mariner and ruler of Atlantis, is enamored with the Invisible Woman.  Yes, that story’s been done dozens of times before.  I even covered four of those seduction attempts in a previous article.  But today involves something a long time coming: Mr. Fantastic’s response.  After all, Namor makes no secret about his affections towards Reed Richards’ wife.

But before Mr. Fantastic shows up, Namor’ll try to seduce Sue again in Marvel Knight 4 #8-9, written by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and drawn by Jim Muniz.  By the way, I had never even heard of this 30 issue series until just this week, but oh my god, it is good.  Aguirre-Sacasa should be given whatever comic book medals they have and showered with bloggers’ (and the industry’s) attention and love.

In the current arc, harsh times have befallen the Fantastic Four.  Due to bankruptcy, they now live in a rundown apartment across the city and have all taken “real” jobs to make some extra money.  Sue teaches.

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I’m also an English teacher as well, but I don’t look as good as she does in a dress.  Sue has always been portrayed as wildly beautiful, even by comic book standards (where everyone’s super power is to also be super good-looking).  You can understand why Namor finds her so intoxicating.  Also, I love any man who opens his flirting with Shakespeare:

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You know, like Sue cannot help but finally succumb to Atlantean royalty.  His superhero costume’s just a speedo, remember.

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Except comic book bloggers who quote Shakespeare, ladies.  So the two of them hang out together, because Namor’s not really the kind of man who’s easy to reject.  Plus, her husband’s been ignoring her lately.

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That last line is wonderful, by the way.  Now comes the seduction attempt where Namor uses his imposing physicality, flowery language, and dash of arrogance to appeal to Sue’s base desires. Spoiler alert: nope.

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We should discuss a known fact of the Marvel universe: Mr. Fantastic’s a fairly terrible husband and father.  He lacks the inability to understand Sue’s emotions.  He spends more time in his lab than with his kids.  I’d call him neglectful, but that’s fairly mean.  Look, he loves Sue, he loves his children, and they all love him back.  I promise you.  And see?  He’s trying to be a good husband here, though there may be one little fish to take care of first.

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Right?  Mr. Fantastic’s a total badass.  He even packs some one-liners:

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We don’t see Mr. Fantastic fight very often.  He is the smartest man in the world, after all.  Most of his contributions to the team involve science gizmos or genius conclusions or stretchy containment or whatever.  But that doesn’t mean he can’t fight.  Plus with his superpowers — the body plasticity, he remains incredibly difficult to take down.  Punches, guns, and normal weapons don’t really do much. Still, Namor’s powers include flight, underwater breathing, and super strength — so punching’s going to have to do for our Sea King.

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Namor’s outdated beliefs on women have been stated several times in comics.  Sure, Sue would possess every luxury she ever desired in Atlantis, but make note: Namor’ll wear the pants (speedo) in that relationship.  Though even with Sue’s public rejection and now sucker punch, he still believes it’s only a matter of time before she sees the light.  That kind of delusion makes me crazy jealous.

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The fight ends here as the Human Torch brings forth a more pressing manner.

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Regardless of what you read today, Namor’s a superhero and he demonstrates it fully in the rest of the issue.  You can buy the book for that.  I hope you aren’t done with Fantastic Four articles, because Friday’ll be one more.  I don’t think they get the attention (or movies) they deserve.

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2 Comments on “Mr. Fantastic vs. Namor”

  1. reecemjones says:

    They seemingly don’t. Everything FF I’ve read from the past few years is brilliant (before that the quality was more up and down), but they get stuck with the ‘boring’ title for some reason.

  2. Henry Cuevas says:

    The question had NOT been answered. WHY DID SHE ENCOURAGE HIM? It should have been addressed and not forgotten. It is such cowardice from Marvel writers that make Sue look like a wanna-be slut. Maybe she wanted the volatile Subby away from her class. That was the correct thing to do, but not answering the question makes the writer childish (looking for thrills) and spineless.

    Stan Lee and Jack Kirby put this stupid thing to rest in FF # 27 (1964 or’65). Sue felt something for him, but it was fueled by pity that Namor lost his people and he was alone. Now along come modern duffus writers thinking that flirting with marital betrayal make up for a supposed disinterest in retread tales, but they never drop the other shoe (see Namor-Sue talk in Civil War). I try not to judge people I don’t know, but I suspect that these writers may be failures in keeping a woman’s interest and this is sort of therapy for them. Why (other than your lack of faith in your writing ability) would you bring up something that was settled long ago?

    Is she a slut or no? Make up your mind, I say. And let’s not hear this BS that an inattentive spouse leads one to infidelity. NO ONE LEADS YOU TO SCREW AROUND. IT’S YOUR DICISION TO BE A SKANK WIFE OR A PILE OF DOG CRAP HUSBAND.

    If she is “Slutty Sue” than let’s be done with it and give Reed a heart-healer. I suggest another spouse who was betrayed— THE NEARLY ASGARDIAN-POWERED JEAN GREY would be a great lover.

    If Sue is a faithful wife and caring mom, then stop this crap, because it’s old and downright irritating.

    By the way I’m a Sub-Mariner fan, but I appreciate the Buscema-drawn, Thomas-written nobility of the pre- 1970s. Todays’ Namor reflect the immaturity of the undisciplined infantile-minded writers who appeal to like minds.


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